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Nintendo Switch owners may need to start thinking about picking up some extra storage. With a steady stream of new games coming to the Nintendo eShop, the 32GB native to the console won’t cut it for long. In fact, Dragon Quest Heroes I (and its sequel) take up more space than what’s available. To get around this limit, you need a micro SD card. Remember that not all storage is the same!

Finding the Right Size

Most games a month out from launch only take up a few GB of space. Dragon Quest Heroes I is an exception. And as Nintendo pushes forward, it will become more and more standard to see larger game sizes. A 64GB card should be An image of the Kingston SDCG/64GBSP micro SD cardenough to handle most cases.

For those planning on buying something to last, a 128GB or larger card will suit higher-usage needs. The Nintendo Switch supports up to a 2TB micro SD card.

Don’t Forget the Speed

Slow cards mean players will be waiting on long loading times. Plus, in some cases, even saving.

Aside from all of the other tech talk about what micro SD cards work with what slots, there are a few things to keep in mind when purchasing for the Nintendo Switch. Most class 10/UHS class 3 cards should be up to the task. These cards are compatible, and cards in that class have at least 30 MB/s speeds.

To break it down further, look for cards with high read speeds. A 90 MB/s rating will be the best bang for your buck right now and plenty fast to keep up. Write speeds are important too, but not nearly as much as read speeds are – at least in general.

Especially while downloading games, internet speed is what matters anyway. It’s best to stay above that 45 MB/s mark if you can, though.

Manufacturers

There are tons of manufacturers to choose from, so play it safe by going with a known and trusted manufacturer. A $2 price difference does not mean much when your data is on the line. SanDisk, Samsung and Kingston all make great cards, and they have been in the game for a long time.

Historically, Kingston has been my go-to brand due to reliability and pricing. In fact, they make up 7/8 cards in my case right now. As of the release of this article, they have a great $40 card on Amazon.

An image of the Kingston SDCG/64GBSP micro SD card and adapterFirst-Hand Experience

Since release day of the Nintendo Switch, I have had a Gold Series Kingston 90MB/s read, 45MB/s write in the system. I’ve tested saving, loading, and download times both to the card as well as the system.

The times are virtually the same, and it has been an incredibly smooth process. Once inserted, the Switch will automatically download and install to the card.

I’ve tested saving, loading and download times both to the card as well as the system. The times are virtually the same, and it has been an extremely smooth process. Once inserted, the system will automatically download and install to the card.

Images of SD cards copyright Kingston.

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